Let’s face it – there’s tons of turnover in the restoration industry. Hopefully, you won’t need to use this resource often, but when the time comes, it’s good to know some places where you can post up an open position or find a few high-quality resumes.

Five Job Posting Websites for Restoration Marketing Jobs

  • Indeed.com - https://ads.indeed.com/?gclid=CJG7nfDG0rUCFUWd4AodzW8Atg

Probably one of my favorites, indeed.com boast of over 80 million unique visitors and 1.5 billion job searches per month. That’s a lot of people looking for jobs. Online since 2004, the website is definitely up-and-coming in the world of job postings. As far as pricing, Indeed.com operates off a pay-per-click method - https://ads.indeed.com/Post-Jobs of payment – meaning you only pay when someone clicks on your ad. With their average click ranging between $.25 – $1.50, it’s up to you on how much you would like to spend. Music to your budget’s ears.

Monster is one of the big daddies in the job posting work. Publicly traded on the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE: MWW), Monster - http://www.about-monster.com/content/who-we-are is one of the first websites to test the digital job recruitment world back in 1994, and is a great way to get your position in front of the eyes of eager job seekers. You can post between 30 – 60 day job listing at $210 to $395 based on your location – pricey in comparison, but I’d pay $100 now for quality rather than thousands to someone who can’t do their job later. That said, Monster’s screening process is nil and you’re stuck reading through resumes as you would with any other website.

Linkedin is not only a social networking site for the business minded, but it is also a job posting forum (log into linkedin and look along the right side of your browser window). Like Monster.com, Linkedin is a flat fee based on your location for an ad that runs 30 – 60 days. Within the marketing and advertising industry, Linkedin boasts of 1,725 average views per job post and 100 applicants per job. With the person’s online resume right there, this may a great time saving alternative to sites like Monster where you’re given a bunch of PDFs to sift through.

  • Craigslist.com

I tread lightly when recommending Craigslist. Why? Because you’re going to get hundreds of applicants – even for really specific jobs. Why? Because Craigslist is a catch-all for both job applicants and job postings. Why? I think you’re asking too many “why” questions – kidding. But seriously, it’s a free-for-all here driven by a bad job market and a bunch of people doing the bare minimum to qualify for unemployment perks. Craigslist job listing fees are based on location and run for a flat fee (for example, San Fran has a flat fee of $75 per job post). A great option to fill in entry level positions, but if you’re looking for something more specialized, I’d stick to the above 3.

  • Referrals

Ask. Your. Employees. It’s funny to me how much restoration companies stress the whole ‘word-of-mouth’ bit but when it comes to their own internal affairs, it’s like foreign policy. If I’m heading to a dentist because I found a good review online, but my gym buddy says “I went there, they’re terrible.” Do you think I’m still going to go to that dentist? If you bet yes, you should probably stay away from the gambling tables because NO of course not! So why not take that same mentality and apply it to your employee search? Odds are, your current employees know a few people and don’t live under rocks (maybe a few of them do… we won’t judge).

 

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